What is Anaphylaxis ?

Anaphylaxis (anna – fill -axis) is a serious allergic reaction. It can be life-threatening. Food is the most common cause of anaphylaxis, but insect stings, medicine, latex, or exercise can also cause a reaction. The most common food allergens are peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, egg, fish, sesame, soy, wheat, milk products and sulphites.

Anaphylaxis affects multiple body systems, all or one of the following: skin, upper and lower respiratory, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular. Anaphylactic shock is an overreaction of the body’s immune system to a triggering agent (allergen). Various reactions can occur when an anaphylaxis reaction takes place, like swelling, difficulty breathing, abdominal cramps, vomiting, circulatory collapse, coma and death.

Symptoms of anaphylactic shock tend to develop rapidly although the initial presentation can be delayed and/or deceptively mild. The victim may become uneasy, upset and red in the face. They may also develop a rapid heartbeat, prickling and itchiness in the skin, throbbing in the ears, sneezing, coughing and difficulty breathing. Shock may then follow, in which blood vessels become leaky, blood pressure falls and the person becomes cold, clammy and faint.

Approximately 1-2 percent of Canadians live with the risk of an anaphylactic reaction. More than 50 percent of Canadians know someone with a life-threatening allergy.

Although anaphylaxis is most often diagnosed in childhood, it can also develop later in life. Living with anaphylaxis can be a challenge. People with this condition must learn how to avoid the allergen that causes their reaction. They must also be prepared to manage an unexpected reaction.

ALTHOUGH IT IS UNCOMMON, WITHOUT IMMEDIATE MEDICAL AID, DEATH MAY RESULT.

If you, or someone you love, has allergy concerns, make sure that you bring them up with your doctor and follow up with a referral to an allergist if necessary.

For updated information and statistics on Anaphylaxis, please visit

http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/whatsnew/hot_topics.asp

Since 2005, Health Canada has reported 4% of the population : 6 – 8 % of children under 18years of age (of course these children are now over 18 years of age) have anaphylaxis.

Dr Ann Clarke also said “THEORETICALLY, ANYONE WITH FOOD ALLERGY IS AT RISK OF ANAPHYLAXIS”.

Her report also stated food allergies have increased 350% in 11 years; while allergies to peanuts increased 250%.

Where The Money Goes:

We are proud to say that he proceeds from the Walk To Axe Anaphylaxis will go to The Canadian Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Foundation.  For more information, please visit www.allergyfoundation.ca

THE CANADIAN ALLERGY, ASTHMA AND IMMUNOLOGY FOUNDATION

The Canadian Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Foundation (CAAIF) is a registered charity, dedicated to:

• Funding research into the causes, prevention and treatment of allergic diseases

• Educating health care professionals, patients and the public about the advances in research and treatment in this important health care field.

We are committed to excellence in research, education and training in all areas of allergy, asthma, immunology and allergic diseases in Canada.

ALLERGIES & ASTHMA AFFECT 30-35% OF ALL CANADIANS!

Did you know that allergic diseases and asthma have increased significantly in the past twenty years?

Sufferers and their families experience a measurable decrease in their quality of life, reduced productivity and performance and a great many lost school and work days. The impact can be devastating and, in some cases, life threatening!

While the allergic population is expanding, funding and resources for research and specialized care is shrinking! This does not make sense. Something must be done!

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

GET INVOLVED!

By donating to CAAIF you are helping us ensure that all Canadians receive the best available treatment, provided by specially trained medic professionals.